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Athenry AC Half-Marathon & 5km [Monivea] results

Sat, 2016-06-25 14:33

Results of the Athenry AC half marathon and Monivea 5km.

Category: Race Result Attachments: athenry-ac-half-2016.pdf monivea-5km-2016.pdf

2016 Galway AAI Half Marathon Road Race Championships in Monivea

Wed, 2016-06-15 11:19
The 2016 Galway AAI Half Marathon Road Race Championships will take place in Monivea on Saturday, 25 June.  Enter via here.  The event is being hosted and run by Athenry AC.   All Galway clubs are encouraged to ensure that they have teams of women and men competing in this fabulous event.  The results of these championships will be based on the race's official result and it's incumbent on all local athletes to be correctly registered, both club and category.  Galway AAI will produce the County Championship result and get the winners their medals as soon as possible thereafter.   Medals will be assigned as follows:               * 1st/2nd/3rd Male/Female @ Senior, O40, O50               * 1st/2nd Male/Female @ O60 and O70               * 1st/2nd/3rd Male/Female teams of four finishers.     Category: Running News

Upcoming races...

Tue, 2016-06-14 12:09
Lots of races over the next few weeks!  No excuses not to get out and about...   Bullaun is in its second year and runs this Saturday around a panhandle 8KM course.   Then there is a choice of two races this Sunday, the Ballindine 4M at Noon and then the 10th Annaghdown 10KM at 4PM.   St Brendan's BNS have their inaugural 5KM next Thursday week around a new course in Loughrea.   Then the big event of this month, the Athenry AC Half in Monivea next Saturday week. Category: Running News

AAI club and athlete registration information

Tue, 2016-06-14 11:32

See here for an interesting breakdown (to the end of May 2016) of clubs and county athlete registrations with the AAI.  

It is produced monthly and is published on the AAI web site in its News section.

Category: Running News

Kudos to Kay and Joe O'Regan

Mon, 2016-06-13 11:44

See here for one of the many articles done before & after the recent Cork Marathon regarding Kay and Joe O'Regan (ex-Kinvara) of Enniscorthy [both proud Slaney Olympic club stalwarts] and their finishing the full distance, both 80.  I had the great pleasure of meeting them 5 or 6 years ago out in Connemara after Kay finished that full there.  Wonderful people, both full of the joys of life.  RTE's Nationwide did a lovely 10 minute interview with them the week befor the race too, which may still be on their web site via their player.

I will also nod in the direction of Damien Coleman od Blackrock who soloed the sliotar around the entire course in a little under 4.5 hours.  Cork needs all the hurlers they can muster at the moment ;-).

Category: Running News

Lyall runs Cork Marathon

Sun, 2016-06-12 18:27

I first broke 3 hours in the 2012 Cork marathon, running 2:53. Every marathon I ran in 2013, 2014 and 2015 was under 3 hours. In order, these were a 2:54, a 2:52, a 2:45 (pb from Connemara 2014), a 2:47, a 2:58, a 2:48 and another 2:54. I say this for perspective, because last Monday June 6th in Cork, I ran a relatively slow 3:08:31... yet it was one of the most enjoyable marathons I've ever run.

Indulge me please: I need to write a little about the last six months first, before describing this race.

I had a sub-2:40 target in New York last November, but capitulated in the last 10 miles to finish in 2:54. I remember feeling jaded, not exhilarated, on the morning of the race. It was probably a combination of over-training along with the psychological stress of a recent niggling injury. Whatever the reasons, once I hit the Queensboro bridge, the remainder of the race became a write-off. But despite the outcome, I knew I was more or less in 2:40 shape - a 1:16 Athlone half along with a 1:28 in Cork-Cobh preceded New York. After taking it easy in November and December, I started afresh in January.

I was training steadily. Nothing mad - no more than 40-45 miles a week. I managed a 3:03 in awful conditions in the rescheduled Clonakilty race at the start of Feb. [Aside: That was probably my worst ever marathon experience. It was utterly miserable weather: my hands were too numb to open an energy gel after 17 miles! I full-on hit the wall in the last 5 miles: I walked parts, and got disoriented and nearly stumbled off the road. Also my mom was hovering over me for about a half hour after finishing as I sat crumpled in a chair - she's never done that before.] Anyway. A couple of weeks later I comfortably (ish) ran a marathon in training, and three days after that ran a 1:19 half in Cambridge (my brother lives there - good excuse to visit). That was the end of Feb. The bad experience in Clon apart, it was the sort of stuff that made me think: "I'm getting back to a good level."

Then tendinitis struck. The Cambridge race had escalated a niggle into acute pain. Right foot, inside ankle - diagnosed as tibialis anterior tendinitis. Training stopped.

Five days later, on Friday 4th March, I finished up with my job at Paddy Power in Clonskeagh. For most of the second half of 2015, my anxiety levels had been going through the roof. The work environment had played a significant part in that. I covered it up (or maybe added to it) with the hard training I was putting in for New York, but after I crashed and burned in that race - with nothing to show for the time and effort invested - I was now exposed to the reality of a job and a set of social interactions that were stressing me out. It took me until only very recently to properly understand this. It took me till February to figure out I needed to change job.

I started a new job in Blackrock in mid-March. I suddenly had no stress. No social anxiety. I wasn't training (because of the tendinitis) but I didn't mind. I commuted by bike and DART. Dublin bay panned across the view out the train window every morning and evening. I fell inwards a bit - stopped seeking out conversation, stopped texting friends. I wandered around Dublin 7 some evenings, exploring. I went to cafes on my own and read my book. I went to work, came home, watched TV, listened to music. I stopped worrying about life.

I ran the Connemara half in mid-April (after entering ages ago, too stubborn to discard the entry), with no proper training since the end of Feb. It went okay, but it aggravated an otherwise improving tendinitis injury. Ooops. I stopped running altogether then, until mid-May when I ran a trail race half-marathon in Italy while visiting a friend. That went okay too - I just jogged around and tried to enjoy it. It also seemed to produce less tendon-related fallout than Connemara. I was still doing no training whatsoever though, with the Cork marathon looming.

Do I bail on Cork? It was a question I was asking myself. This would be the tenth year since the event was rebooted in 2007, and I've participated every year (two relays and seven marathons). I couldn't bail on Cork.

Last Saturday I jogged 4 miles around the block at home. "Well, that's training sorted," I said to my mom, flippantly. And so I went into the race with absolutely no goals or expectations. Like, properly none. This was new. Even the races for which I've been ill-prepared in recent years, well, I'd still have done *some* training for them, so still had some notion of what time I'd likely run. Like in Dublin 2014, I'd only just moved job from Galway to Dublin, and with all the churn had only managed five weeks training, but still wanted to sneak under 3 hours. You know the feeling, right? You tell yourself: "I'm happy to just get around today. No real target." But deep down, you still have a target. Well, this year in Cork, I had absolutely no target. No pressure. It was really and truly liberating. It was like... sitting on your own in a cafe with a book and being totally content in yourself, happy to let the rest of the world pass you by.

Okay okay. It's race day. With all the above said and done, it turned out I was still fit enough to run comfortably with the 3 hour pace group for about 14 miles. So I did. I knew I'd probably fade, but didn't mind. We ran solid 6:48's (+/- a few seconds at most) to half-way.

As we ran along the old railway line to the Marina, I dropped back behind the pace group, and settled into 7:20 per mile pace for the next seven or eight miles. I thanked or saluted spectators as they gave us their applause. I high-fived the outstretched hands of kids. I stopped for a sec near Turner's Cross to take jelly babies from one little boy - he was way too happy about that.

At the Victoria road relay changeover, someone shouted at me: "Get the blog going again Lyall." That was a nice thing to hear. Just before that, I passed a runner who shouted at my back, "ten in a row Lyall!" I don't know how he knew me, but he was also doing his tenth - all marathons, in fairness. No messing around with relays!

I smiled for most of the second half. It probably turned to a grimace a few times, but the smile wasn't long returning.

I started to feel the heat and the heavy legs for the last few miles, while coming in along the Carrigrohane road and the Mardyke. I had to drop down to 8:00 per mile territory, but didn't mind. I finished out the brilliant last mile, starting with the winding river path by the old distillery, in the north mall, along the quays, and then finally rounding the corner onto Patrick's street and the spectator-lined finish.

I love running the Cork marathon, but most of the other years, it's been all about the the race, the athletic endeavour, the finish time, the highs and lows, the elation or the dismay. This time it was simply about running this race that I love running, and I cherished every minute of it.

Report: Lyall Guiney
Race Results
http://www.sportsplits.com/Home/QuickResults?clientId=74&raceId=168&cult...

Category: Race Reports

Jane Ann Meehan selected for 2020 Olympic Marathon Mission Panel!

Thu, 2016-06-09 20:32

Jane Ann has been selected for the 2020 Olympic Marathon Mission Panel. This panel comprises the top 12 distance athletes in the country. Jane Ann and the other 11 athletes including Maria McCambridge and Fionnuala Britton will be coached, advised and supported by Athletics Ireland to get the very best from these elite athletes with the target of getting an Irish singlet to the European Championships, World Championships and the Olympics. Jane Ann has been selected by attaining a national standard in the marathon, half marathon, 10 mile and 10km distances.

This is a well deserved opportunity for Jane Ann and a great achievement. Over the past 12 months in particular through hard work and commitment to training she has won many races and achieved PB's in every distance she has run. In April 2015 Jane Ann ran her first sub 3 hour marathon in Manchester repeating the performance again this year. Another significant result in Dungarvan in October where Jane Ann finished 3rd in a 10 mile road race. This race is one of the most competitive 10 mile races in the country with 2,500 athletes running in this event. Jane Ann finished ahead of Maria McCambridge (Rio qualifier) with a 40 seconds PB completing the distance in 59.33. Dublin City Marathon 2015 Jane Ann picked up a Silver medal in the National Marathon Championships. More recently she finished in 8th place out of a field of 35,000 athletes in the VHI Women's Mini Marathon in Dublin on Monday.

For her many running achievements in 2015 she was awarded "Performance of the Year Award" by Athenry AC, she also won the Senior Women's category at the County Galway Athletics Awards in March.

Jane Ann is a unique athlete, she somehow gets a balance between family life, work and training. She prioritises all 3 equally, not an easy task! In addition we acknowledge her valuable contribution and commitment to the club notably by leading the speed sessions on Tuesday nights amongst other things. She is progressive in her thinking, and organised "Get Moving Talk Series" again this year, two nights of the most recent advice and information on physical, mental and intestinal health for all members of the club. She also organised a Cryospa Day at her clinic.

Along her journey Jane Ann has been supported by her husband David, who has encouraged her all the way and David is also proving to be a talented athlete himself! We wish Jane Ann continued success and the best of luck over the next few years and we hope all her dreams come true. She is a great ambassador for the club.

Report: Anne Lyng

Category: Running News

Streets 8KM

Thu, 2016-06-09 12:04
Date: Saturday, 6 August, 2016 - 19:00

See here for more details...

Sixmilebridge (BMOH) 10Km, June 3rd 2016

Sun, 2016-06-05 20:57

As the tar melted around the roads of Athenry we made the trip to Sixmilebridge in Clare for the annual BMOH 10km in glorious sunshine. Chris made an unusual comment for an Irishman as we hit the M18 near Gort that "thankfully it looks like there may be some cloud cover ahead". This weather prediction did not ring true.

Depending on whether you were saving turf or running a 10km race you would have a different opinion as the mercury hit 24°C by the time we landed in Clare.
There was some sympathy for the holiday makers heading to Shannon airport as the wettest weather in 35 years was taking place on the continent.

Admiring the beautiful countryside and vast rolling hills as we entered the village little did we know we would be cursing these same hills pretty soon.
We headed for the local school and handed over a very reasonable sum of €15 for our race number and a souvenir mug. The nearest thing to a cup we would receive this evening!

With some great music playing in the background and one of the most entertaining MC's that you'll find, it set the scene for the evenings event. One thing I noticed is the Clare lads have strong bladders. I took the Galway man's usual two trips prior to the race start and not a sinner to be seen on either occasion.

Race brief was to the point, and without fuss the gun went off as advertised at 7:00 P.M. As we settled into race pace the field quickly spread out and two local lads powered on out of sight by the 4km mark.
At 5km the rolling hills were taking their toll and I was thinking the two weeks spent in Portugal recently were great for my sanity but not as good for my fitness levels.

Battling on for the next few km's, I now realise a sarcastic F'er had a sign at 8km which read "No more hills, really!".
My spirits were lifted as I naively believed, but of course this was short lived.

At 8.5km we hit a Ryehill like stretch that went upwards until 9.75km, I crossed the large inflatable finish arch with the tank emptied, sweat streaming but well happy to have gotten an honest hard run under the belt before the next training cycle begins post the holiday season.

The course profile - I really can't remember any flat sections along the route!

All three Athenry lads (Chris Deakin, Kieran Staunton and I) passed the line in quick succession and all placed in the top 10.
There was a complimentary leg massage provided by a charted physiotherapist which was a godsend after the hammering the legs received in the previous hour. Also two evening spent in the bog earlier in the week required some quad TLC.

The post race spread would have fed the entire club, top class grub and lots of it. Hats off to all involved in organising this event. The runners were catered for in a manner that sets the bar high for all others.

Great evening was had by all and the usual craic and banter was had with some very friendly locals. One chap of course asked "Did ye Athenry lads travel up to win the race". All I could do was laugh as I knew whatever answer I might give he had already formed his own opinion.

Report by Gearoid Rohan

Results:
https://sites.google.com/site/runninginireland/results-of-the-sixmilebri...

Category: Race Reports

Sixmilebridge (BMOH) 10Km, June 3rd 2016

Sun, 2016-06-05 20:57

As the tar melted around the roads of Athenry we made the trip to Sixmilebridge in Clare for the annual BMOH 10km in glorious sunshine. Chris made an unusual comment for an Irishman as we hit the M18 near Gort that "thankfully it looks like there may be some cloud cover ahead". This weather prediction did not ring true.

Depending on whether you were saving turf or running a 10km race you would have a different opinion as the mercury hit 24°C by the time we landed in Clare.
There was some sympathy for the holiday makers heading to Shannon airport as the wettest weather in 35 years was taking place on the continent.

Admiring the beautiful countryside and vast rolling hills as we entered the village little did we know we would be cursing these same hills pretty soon.
We headed for the local school and handed over a very reasonable sum of €15 for our race number and a souvenir mug. The nearest thing to a cup we would receive this evening!

With some great music playing in the background and one of the most entertaining MC's that you'll find, it set the scene for the evenings event. One thing I noticed is the Clare lads have strong bladders. I took the Galway man's usual two trips prior to the race start and not a sinner to be seen on either occasion.

Race brief was to the point, and without fuss the gun went off as advertised at 7:00 P.M. As we settled into race pace the field quickly spread out and two local lads powered on out of sight by the 4km mark.
At 5km the rolling hills were taking their toll and I was thinking the two weeks spent in Portugal recently were great for my sanity but not as good for my fitness levels.

Battling on for the next few km's, I now realise a sarcastic F'er had a sign at 8km which read "No more hills, really!".
My spirits were lifted as I naively believed, but of course this was short lived.

At 8.5km we hit a Ryehill like stretch that went upwards until 9.75km, I crossed the large inflatable finish arch with the tank emptied, sweat streaming but well happy to have gotten an honest hard run under the belt before the next training cycle begins post the holiday season.

The course profile - I really can't remember any flat sections along the route!

All three Athenry lads (Chris Deakin, Kieran Staunton and I) passed the line in quick succession and all placed in the top 10.
There was a complimentary leg massage provided by a charted physiotherapist which was a godsend after the hammering the legs received in the previous hour. Also two evening spent in the bog earlier in the week required some quad TLC.

The post race spread would have fed the entire club, top class grub and lots of it. Hats off to all involved in organising this event. The runners were catered for in a manner that sets the bar high for all others.

Great evening was had by all and the usual craic and banter was had with some very friendly locals. One chap of course asked "Did ye Athenry lads travel up to win the race". All I could do was laugh as I knew whatever answer I might give he had already formed his own opinion.

Report by Gearoid Rohan

Results:
https://sites.google.com/site/runninginireland/results-of-the-sixmilebri...

Category: Race Reports

Galway 5km Series - Athenry

Tue, 2016-05-31 22:40

Results from tonight's race in Athenry. Well done everyone!

http://www.redtagtiming.com/results/Galway5km2016_6_Athenry.pdf

Race report to follow

Category: Race Reports